Doug Price
Professional Affiliations
  • Estate Planning Council of Cleveland
  • Society of Financial Service Professionals
  • Diamond Advisory Group, University Hospitals
  • Estate Planning Advisory Council, CWRU
  • National Association of Estate Planners & Councils (NAEPC)
Professional Credentials, Recognition, & Education
  • CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (CFP®)
  • FINRA Series 7 and 66 Registrations
  • BA in Economics from Denison University
  • MA in Economics from Case Western Reserve University
  • Life, Accident, and Health Insurance Licensed
  • Accredited Estate Planner® (AEP®)
"Follow up on what you promise."

With over 20 years of banking, insurance, trust, investment and financial planning experience, Doug knows the importance communication plays in the financial services industry. His clients value his quick follow through and the open line of communication he fosters. Before joining Capital Advisors, Ltd in 2008, Doug served as Vice President in Private Client Services at a regional Cleveland bank where he primarily managed relationships for investment management and trust clients.

"We see things our clients don't."

At Capital Advisors, Ltd. Doug's known for his proactive approach to managing a client's business, coupled with his compassion for helping clients navigate financial decisions that are sometimes emotional ones. He sees himself as an advocate for the client, diving deep into their situation to uncover and clearly explain the opportunities or risks the client might not realize.

"Make the overwhelming feel simple."

Doug was drawn to the financial field at an early age. After his father passed away from complications related to Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Doug experienced first-hand the need for straightforward, smart financial planning. Doug uses these skills not only for the benefit of his clients but also as an Emeritus Board Member, and former Chairman, for the Ohio Buckeye Chapter of the National MS Society. During his tenure as Chair, he helped the organization significantly reduce their deficit while raising over $4 million a year for research.